Monday, June 18, 2007

A belated Father's Day post

I found these at my friend, Barbara's blog and wanted to share them with you!

A college boy wrote his father, “I can’t understand how you can call yourself a kind parent when you haven’t sent me a check in two months.! What kind of kindness is that?”
The father replied, “Son, that’s called ‘unremitting’ kindness.”~~~~~~~~~~

Tom had won a toy in a contest. He called his kids together to ask which one should have the present.
“Who is the most obedient?” he asked. “Who never talks back to mother? Who does everything she says?”
Five small voices answered in unison:
“Okay, Dad, you get the toy.”~~~~~~~~~~

The coed came running in tears to her father. “Dad, you gave me some terrible financial advice!” she cried.“I did? What did I tell you?” said the dad.“You told me to put my money in that big bank, and now that big bank is in trouble.”“What are you talking about? That’s one of the largest banks in the world,” he said. “Surely there must be some mistake.”“I don’t think so,” she sniffed. “They just returned one of my checks with a note saying, ‘Insufficient Funds’.”~~~~~~~~~~

One summer evening during a violent thunderstorm a mother was tucking her small boy into bed. She was about to turn off the light when he asked with a tremor in his voice, “Mommy, will you sleep with me tonight?”
The mother smiled and gave him a reassuring hug. “I can’t dear,” she said. “I have to sleep in Daddy’s room.”
A long silence was broken at last by a shaken little voice saying, “The big sissy.”~~~~~~~~~~

One night a wife found her husband standing over their newborn baby’s crib. Silently she watched him. As he stood looking down at the sleeping infant, she saw on his face a mixture of emotions: disbelief, doubt, delight, amazement, enchantment, skepticism.Touched by this unusual display and the deep emotions it aroused, with eyes glistening she slipped her arms around her husband.“A penny for your thoughts,” she whispered in his ear.
“It’s amazing!” he replied. “I just can’t see how anybody can make a crib like that for only $66.95!”~~~~~~~~~~

Junior had just received his brand new driver’s license. The family trooped out to the driveway, and climbed into the car, where he was about to take them for a ride for the first time.
Dad immediately headed for the back seat, directly behind the newly minted driver.
“I’ll bet you’re back there to get a change of scenery after all those months of sitting in the front passenger seat teaching me how to drive,” said the beaming boy to the ol’ man.
“Nope,” came dad’s reply, “I’m gonna sit here and kick the back of your seat as you drive, just like you’ve been doing to me all these years.”~~~~~~~~~~

Fathers of 1900 and Fathers of Today:
In 1900, if a father put a roof over his family’s head, he was a success.Today, it takes a roof, deck, pool, and 4-car garage. And that’s just the vacation home.
In 1900, a father waited for the doctor to tell him when the baby arrived.Today, a father must wear a smock, know how to breathe, and make sure film is in the video camera.
In 1900, fathers could count on children to join the family business.Today, fathers pray their kids will soon come home from college long enough to teach them how to work the computer and set the VCR.
In 1900, fathers shook their children gently and whispered, “Wake up, it’s time for school.”Today, kids shake their fathers violently at 4 a.m., shouting: “Wake up, it’s time for hockey practice.”
In 1900, a father came home from work to find his wife and children at the supper table.Today, a father comes home to a note: “Jimmy’s at baseball, Cindy’s at gymnastics, I’m at gym, Pizza in fridge.”
In 1900, a Father’s Day gift would be a hand tool.Today, he’ll get a digital organizer.
In 1900, “a good day at the market” meant Father brought home feed for the horses.Today, “a good day at the market” means Dad got in early on an IPO.

5 comments:

Barbara H. said...

Glad you enjoyed the fatherhood funnies! :D

Jewel said...

Yes, I did, Barbara! I love a good, cute, funny story!! Thanks! :-)

Jewel said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Ronda Hurst said...

Enjoyed this post, especially the one about the difference in the 1900 father and the fathers of today. Interesting.

Jewel said...

Hi, Sis. Hurst! Yes, things have certainly changed, even in my 55-year lifetime.